Chapter 14 Booklet Essay

How does society and culture make our world *function*. Society and culture have revolved all over us everywhere we are and go. Society and culture has been around ever since the medieval times, U.S history, and today. Most of the people’s society and culture is based on religion, politics, ect.

The first example of the *development* of society and culture took place in Europe, in the 1800s. The Europeans’ main society *method* was religion. There were a few *consequences* to their religion and cultures. Where ever explores and missionaries went they took their religious cultures with them. According to the 7th grade history textbook, “In this way, the distribution of religions in Europe shaped religious patterns around the world. For example, some parts of the Americas were settled by people from Catholic countries such as Spain, France, and Portugal. These areas, including parts of Canada and most of Mexico, Central America, and South America, became Catholic.”  In different, places *influenced* by Protestants from England and other countries, including the 13 colonies that became the United States, became mostly Protestant.

Another example took place in New York City, 1854, where most of their society was about slavery and politics. Some northern wanted to outlaw slavery in all parts of the Mexico cession. During the war, Representative David Wilmot offered Wilmot proviso, which *implicated* a document stating that “neither slavery nor involuntary servitude shall ever exist in any part of the territory.” According to the 8th grade history text book “the northern-controlled house passed the document, but in the senate, the south had more power,” and the Wilmot proviso didn’t pass. “Before this time, politicians had usually supported the ideas of their political parties.” The Wilmot proviso was *implemented* in a debate, which showed growing in sectionalism; favoring the interests of one section or region over the interests of the entire country.

A more recent example about American society and culture was about the pope and a new election of popes because the old one had retired. Pope Francis is being announced as a new champion for the Catholic Church’s New Evangelization campaign, the push to revive flagging Catholic faith and practice. But experts question whether the Argentine-born pope will do better at promoting a strong religious identity than globe-trotting Pope John Paul II and now-retired Benedict XVI, who coined, “New Evangelization” *influences*. This is the type of society that most Americans share. According to the article “Can Pope Francis revive flagging faith?”, “Latin America and the Caribbean have become “simultaneously less Catholic while gaining a larger share of the global Catholic population (49% in 1010).”

 Bibliography:

Holt California Social Studies World History: Medieval to Early Modern Times ©2006

Holt California Social Studies United States History: Independence to 1914 ©2006

Article “Can Pope Francis revive flagging faith?”

Advertisements

One thought on “Chapter 14 Booklet Essay

  1. How does society and culture make our world *function*. Society and culture have revolved all over us everywhere we are and go. Society and culture has been around ever since the medieval times, U.S history, and today. Most of the people’s society and culture is based on religion, politics, ect.
    The first example of the *development* of society and culture took place in Europe, in the 1800s. The Europeans’ main society *method* was religion. There were a few *consequences* to their religion and cultures. Where ever explores and missionaries went they took their religious cultures with them. According to the 7th grade history textbook, “In this way, the distribution of religions in Europe shaped religious patterns around the world. For example, some parts of the Americas were settled by people from Catholic countries such as Spain, France, and Portugal. These areas, including parts of Canada and most of Mexico, Central America, and South America, became Catholic.” In different, places *influenced* by Protestants from England and other countries, including the 13 colonies that became the United States, became mostly Protestant.
    Another example took place in New York City, 1854, where most of their society was about slavery and politics. Some northern wanted to outlaw slavery in all parts of the Mexico cession. During the war, Representative David Wilmot offered Wilmot proviso, which *implicated* a document stating that “neither slavery nor involuntary servitude shall ever exist in any part of the territory.” According to the 8th grade history text book “the northern-controlled house passed the document, but in the senate, the south had more power,” and the Wilmot proviso didn’t pass. “Before this time, politicians had usually supported the ideas of their political parties.” The Wilmot proviso was *implemented* in a debate, which showed growing in sectionalism; favoring the interests of one section or region over the interests of the entire country.
    A more recent example about American society and culture was about the pope and a new election of popes because the old one had retired. Pope Francis is being announced as a new champion for the Catholic Church’s New Evangelization campaign, the push to revive flagging Catholic faith and practice. But experts question whether the Argentine-born pope will do better at promoting a strong religious identity than globe-trotting Pope John Paul II and now-retired Benedict XVI, who coined, “New Evangelization” *influences*. This is the type of society that most Americans share. According to the article “Can Pope Francis revive flagging faith?”, “Latin America and the Caribbean have become “simultaneously less Catholic while gaining a larger share of the global Catholic population (49% in 1010).”
    Bibliography:
    Holt California Social Studies World History: Medieval to Early Modern Times ©2006
    Holt California Social Studies United States History: Independence to 1914 ©2006
    Article “Can Pope Francis revive flagging faith?”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s